A Guide To Road tripping In Australia

The Christmas celebrations and New Year parties are done. But the cold winter isn’t, and you’re itching to travel somewhere where Christmas and New Year isn’t spent huddled in front of a fireplace for warmth. Yep – we’re talking about Australia, folks! Where you won’t have a problem getting a tan in January. And you’re not alone. From December to February, the country welcomes millions of travellers from Europe, Asia and the U.S. Australia, after all, offers more than just beautiful beaches. It’s home to epic 4WD adventures, world famous scenic drives, off-the-beaten track hikes and more. So much more.

The best way to go around and experience the country? Hire a campervan from any Apollo Motorhome Holidays branch in Australia, and be on your way. If you’re visiting the country for the first time though, it can be a little tough adjusting to road rules, weather and more. To help make your road trip even more memorable, we’ve listed a handful of tips that will help you road trip Australia like a boss.

Hire A Campervan

"Apollo Euro Deluxe" BY apollo motorhomes via www.flickr.com/photos/apollorv/5487485239

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, motorhome rentals are the best way to experience all that The Land Down Under has to offer (road trip, thy name is Australia). Sure, you can easily book flights to go from one state to another and use public transportation to go around the cities. But seriously, why do that when you are in the country that practically INVENTED road trips?

Australia is home to some of the most beautiful national parks and camping sites in the world and these places are often located far away from each other. It is practical and easier if you would just hire a campervan and drive your way to them. If you want to keep a few home comforts, you can hire a campervan with a kitchen and shower so you won’t have problems staying in one location for more than a day.

Vehicles of course, are subject to availability and considering Australia’s reputation as a self-drive holiday paradise, we suggest booking a vehicle ahead of time.

Drive On The Left Hand Side

"In this country" BY Ted & Dani Percival via flickr.com/photos/tedpercival/3971585380 under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 2.0. Full license terms at creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0

This is very important. In Australia, you drive on the left hand side of the road. Australians also use the metric system when measuring speeds and distance (km). Vehicles are right hand drive, usually with automatic transmissions although manual transmission vehicles are also available.

If you are driving around Australia for the first time, requesting a rental car or motorhome with an automatic transmission can help with the adjustment period. Oh, and the park brake (hand brake or emergency brake) is usually located in the middle of the vehicle.

Cover Up!

"meditation" BY Elissa Eikelboom via flickr.com/photos/lissae77/8134211126 under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 2.0. Full license terms at creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0

While it is delightful to experience sunny weather in January, especially coming from a country in the middle of winter season, we strongly advise not spending a lot of time under the Aussie sun. Trust us, you would get sunburnt in Australia faster than you would back in the U.S. or anywhere in the planet.

Whether you are driving 4WDs in the outback desert, bush walking or relaxing at the beach, sunblock, hats and drinking water must always be handy.

Mind Them Speed Limits!

"Road-signs" BY Espen Klem via flickr.com/photos/eklem/3131765759 under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 2.0. Full license terms at creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

As with driving around the U.S. and Europe, speed limit signs are easily visible along Australian roads and highways. If you’re renting a car or a motorhome, it would be a good idea to ask about specific speed limits on locations you’re headed to. For example, a 40 kph speed limit is imposed and signposted during school hours in Victoria and New South Wales. It is also important to note that holidays vary from state to state and may affect speed limits. Again, it won’t hurt to as when you pick up your car or motorhome rental.

Speed cameras are used in all states in the country. Some states use hidden speed cams and some areas use aerial and even point to point speed checks. Vehicle rental companies do charge admin fees for speeding or traffic violation fines.

Here’s a tip: you will incur a fine if you park facing oncoming traffic. If you must park your vehicle rental, do so on the left hand side of the road clear of all traffic.

Driving Through Toll Roads

"M1 Monash Freeway" BY AS 1979 via flickr.com/photos/86792135@N04/8459609586. Under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 2.0. Full license terms at creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0

All tolls in Australia are paid electronically through a transmitted fitted inside the vehicle. Or the toll company does a sweep of the rental vehicles on a daily basis and charges the necessary toll fees and fines back to the rental company. In any case, you cannot pay toll fees in cash.

This is also true of some bridges, motorways and tunnels in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne. Again, make sure you that you ask your vehicle rental company about their toll fees and traffic fine policies before heading out.

But by far the most important part on a road trip across Australia is you will absolutely fall in love with the country. In the Land Down Under you can watch the most mesmerising sunsets, hike through the greatest rain forests, take a dip in the clearest lakes and rivers, and relax in some of the world’s most beautiful beaches. On top of that, you will meet the craziest, most adventurous and fun loving people.

So don’t waste any more time planning that Aussie road trip. Book an Apollo Motorhome Holiday right now and start the best self-drive holiday of a lifetime.

 

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