Australia’s hidden treasure, Tasmania is home to some of the country’s most spectacular landscapes, World Heritage listed mountain ranges, a thriving art scene, and some of the country’s finest food. Taking off on a road trip is a wonderful way to experience everything Tasmania has to offer, and gives you the flexibility to take your time while you discover the many natural wonders, farm-gates, and quaint coastal towns that are scattered throughout the state.

To help you explore the best of Tasmania we’ve put together a 9 day itinerary that will take you from Hobart to the state’s famous waterfalls and heritage listed national parks, to blooming lavender farms and laidback seaside towns rich with colonial history, before returning back to Hobart.

Day 1. Hobart > Mount Field National Park (1hour / 63.6km)

After you’ve picked up your new home on wheels from our Hobart branch, set off on your first day with a drive to Tasmania’s oldest national park, Mount Field National Park. Here you’ll find Russell Falls which has become one of Tasmania’s most famous waterfalls – it was even featured on Australia’s first postage stamp! Spend some time exploring the rest of the park which is also home to Lady Barron Falls, Horseshoe Falls, and Lake Dobson. If you’re lucky you might even spot a platypus, eastern quoll, or the eastern barred bandicoot.

Stay overnight at the Mt Field Campground.

Day 2. Mount Field > Cradle Mountain- Lake St Clair- (2 hours / 143km)

Take a short 2 hour drive to Cradle Mountain and Lake St Clair which is part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage area. Here you’ll find ancient pines, glacial lakes and icy streams that cascade down rugged mountains. Climb Cradle Mountain or take a walk around the mirrored waters of Dove Lake.

At night it becomes of the best places to admire the flickering shades of green, blue, purple and red of the Southern Lights (Aurora Australis).

Stay overnight at the Discovery Parks Cradle Mountain.

Image Credit: Laura Helle

Day 3 Lake St Clair > Launceston  (2.5 hrs / 174km)

Today you’ll head to one of Australia’s oldest cities, Launceston, which is a vibrant hub of food and wine, art and culture and colonial architecture.  Visit the town’s art galleries and museums including the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery or the National Automobile Museum of Tasmania.

Stock up on fresh produce at the popular Harvest Market (open every Saturday 8:30am-12:30pm) which brings together a range of organic producers and sustainable suppliers from around Tasmania. Here you’ll find a range of things to try from artisan baked goods, cheese, olives, truffles, and honey, to fresh veggies and fruit.

Stay overnight at the BIG4 Launceston Holiday Park.

Day 4. Launceston > Bridestowe Lavender Estate (Tamar Valley)

Head north-east for 40mins and you’ll arrive at the Bridestow Lavender Estate. Covering 105 hectares (260 acres) it is the world’s largest privately owned fine lavender farm. From Dec-Feb the farm’s 650,000 plants bloom creating a sea of rich vibrant purple. After you’ve admired the view, try some of the farm’s vanilla and lavender-flavoured ice cream at the on-site café.

Afterwards travel along the Tamar Valley Wine Route towards Lavender House, Tasmania’s only working perfumery. Watch through the giant observation window as the lavender is made into essential oils which then forms the base for the wide range of perfumes, natural remedies, aromatherapy, and personal body care products.

When you’re done learning all about Tasmania’s lavender farms, head to Kelso Sands Holiday Park and Native Wildlife Park for your night’s accommodation. The park borders the Narawntapu National Park and features an enchanted forest where you can spot wallabies, Tasmanian devils and eastern spotted quolls. The park is also located in close to some of the Tamar Valley’s best wineries.

Image Credit: Luke Tscharke

Day 5.Tamar Valley > St Helens (2.5 Hours / 160km)

Take a 2.5 hour drive to Tasmania’s second largest fishing port, St Helens which is renowned for it’s deep sea fish and lobsters. The waters are abound with albacore and yellowfin Tuna, and is a popular destination for recreational fishermen. The town is favoured for it’s close proximity to the white sandy beaches, lichen-covered granite boulders and crystal clear waters of Binalong Bay and the Bay of Fires.

Enjoy dinner at one of the towns many restaurants that of course serve fresh local seafood, before spending the night at Big4 St Helens Holiday Park.

Image Credit: Lisa Kuilenburg

Day 6. St Helens > Freycinet National Park (1.5 Hours / 90km)

Freycinet National Park is home to dramatic pink granite peaks, secluded bays, white sandy beaches and abundant birdlife.

There are a range of walks to choose from including the easy 10-minute walk to Sleepy Bay, to the challenging three-hour (return) walk to the summit of Mount Amos. Follow the Wineglass Bay lookout walk (90 minutes return) for spectacular views over the blond sandy arc and ice-blue water of Wineglass Bay, one of Tasmania’s most photographed views.

Stay overnight at the Freycinet National Park Campground.

Image Credit: Jason Charles Hill

Day 7. Freycinet National Park   > Swansea

Overlooking the Great Oyster Bay, Swansea is a laidback seaside village with a rich colonial history and surrounded by beautiful beaches. Head into the town centre to visit the many historic buildings and many cafes and restaurants that showcase produce from nearby vineyards and farm gates and the town’s famous oysters. Just south of Swansea you’ll find Kate’s Berry Farm, where you can enjoy fresh berries, ice cream, jams and berry wines.

Stay overnight at the Swansea Holiday Park.

Day 8. Swansea > Port Arthur & Tasman Peninsula (2.5 hours / 156 km)

One of Australia’s most visited tourist attractions, no trip to Tasmania is complete without a visit the to UNESCO World Heritage-listed Port Arthur. Spread across 40 hectres of landscaped grounds and 30 buildings, the historic site was one of the earliest convict settlements in Australia, housing 12,500 convicts between 1830-1877.

If you have time after your visit to Port Arthur, spend the afternoon exploring the Tasman Peninsula. The area boasts a spectacular coastal environment including soaring 300 metre high sea cliffs and a number of fascinating coastal rock formations such as Tessellated Pavement, the Blow Hole, Tasman Arch, Devil’s Kitchen, Remarkable Cave and Waterfall Bay. It’s home to many animals including the brush tail possum, wallabies, wombats, bandicoots, Australian fur seals, penguins, dolphins and migrating whales as well as the endangered swift parrot and many forest-dwelling birds.

Stay overnight at the White Beach Tourist Park.

Image Credit: Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service

Day 9. Tasman Peninsula > Hobart (1.5 hours / 100km)

It’s time to head back to your starting point of Hobart. If you haven’t explored Tasmania’s capital city, make sure to take some time visit the many art galleries, theatres, cafés and bars that make up it’s vibrant cultural scene. Pick-up boutique jewellery and one-off fashion pieces, or board a ferry at Hobart’s Brooke Street Pier and sail upstream to the daring Museum of Old and New Art, or MONA.

Stay overnight at the Discovery Park Hobart Caravan Park.

 

Ready to book your Tasmanian road trip? Book your campervan or motorhome here

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